Presentation on Historic Homes in Lyttonsville and North Woodside

A historic home in North Woodside

Graduate students in the University of Maryland’s Historic Preservation program have spent the last semester researching the history of eleven houses in Lyttonsville and North Woodside (and one in Woodside).

You are cordially invited to attend the capstone presentation of this historic house and local community research project, which will take place on Wednesday, December 15th at 7 pm, at Woodlin Elementary School. The students will give brief presentations on the histories of each of the twelve houses in the larger context of the history of these communities, with an emphasis on the most useful historic resources for conducting house histories. This event is sponsored by the Talbot Avenue Bridge Committee.*

Location information:
Woodlin Elementary School (cafeteria/multi-purpose room)            
2101 Luzerne Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20910            
Note: Use entrance at left side of building (next to school parking lot)

IMPORTANT SAFETY NOTE: Masks will be required, as well as proof of COVID-19 vaccination (or a negative COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of the event).

Questions?  Contact the Talbot Avenue Bridge Committee

* This activity is not sponsored by, associated with, or endorsed by Montgomery County Public Schools or Montgomery County Government.

4th Annual Talbot Avenue Bridge Lantern Walk

Begun in 2018, the Talbot Avenue Bridge Lantern Walk is an annual local community event that weaves together neighborhoods once divided by racial segregation. All are welcome! Come join us in shining our lights in the darkness, promoting unity over division, remembering the past and taking steps toward a brighter future…

WHEN: Saturday, November 13, 2021
Gather at 5:15pm, Lantern Walk will commence at 5:30pm

WHERE: 4th Avenue and Hanover Street (North Woodside)
to Talbot Avenue and Lanier Road (Lyttonsville), via Brookville Road
See below for three different ways to participate
View route

BRING: Warm clothing, a lantern, and a bell to ring, if you have one
Any type of lantern will do, from a tea light candle in a glass jar to something more elaborate, either handmade or store-bought. You can find many ideas online. If you have the time and energy, you are encouraged to get creative!  Extra lanterns and tea light candles will be available for anyone who needs them.

For more information, any event updates, and to RSVP for this event visit:
bit.ly/TABLanternWalk

Questions? Contact the Talbot Avenue Bridge Committee (consisting of Lyttonsville, North Woodside, and Rosemary Hills residents): talbotavenuebridgecommittee@gmail.com

WAYS TO PARTICIPATE

1) Join for the whole lantern walk.  As the route is again not a loop, as in previous years, this means that North Woodside residents will need to walk back or have someone pick them up in Lyttonsville.

2) Join for a portion of the lantern walk.  For example, some North Woodside residents could join for the portion that goes through the neighborhood (e.g. 4th Ave -> Warren St/A Wider Circle)

3) Watch the lantern walk pass by.  Neighbors who live along the route can come out of their homes to watch, wave, and hold a candle or lantern of their own in solidarity.  Neighbors who live elsewhere can come stand along the lantern walk route and do the same.

Safety Precautions: Any young children who participate should be closely supervised by adults. And all participants are encouraged to RSVP ahead of time, so we have a good sense of expected numbers and can adjust safety precautions accordingly.

Video of the inaugural Talbot Avenue Bridge Lantern Walk (2018):

3rd Annual Talbot Avenue Bridge Lantern Walk

Two North Woodside residents light their lantern candles before the commencement of the 3rd Annual Talbot Avenue Bridge Lantern Walk on November 14, 2020.


As darkness fell, North Woodside, Lyttonsville, and Rosemary Hills neighbors walked—carrying lanterns, ringing bells, and listening to a recording of This Little Light of Mine—along the mile route from one side of the Talbot Avenue Bridge construction site in North Woodside to the other in Lyttonsville, neighborhoods once divided by racial segregation. Lifelong Lyttonsville resident Charlotte Coffield came out and waved as the procession passed by, and David Cox, NWCA President, and Pat Tyson (Lyttonsvillle) joined those who shared eloquent remarks at the end.

For more photos and details, click here.

Event organized by the Talbot Avenue Bridge Committee.

Traffic and Safety Committee Updates

The new Talbot Avenue Bridge in September 2020, before construction halted.

Seminary Road Intersection

The bulk of the road construction work on this project will be completed in early November. Sometime within the next six months, trees and plants will be planted.

The portion of Seminary Road between Seminary Road and Seminary Place, which is now physically a continuation of 2nd Avenue, will be officially renamed 2nd Avenue.

The new traffic lights will be operational in early November and the county will then recalibrate the timing. Also, at that time the new streetlights will begin to work.

Talbot Avenue Bridge

As of Oct. 16, 2020, all construction stopped on the bridge. Due to the inconvenience and the eyesore of the partially built structure, Lyttonsville and Rosemary Hills neighborhood associations sent a letter to Gov. Hogan and other public officials requesting that Talbot Avenue Bridge construction be prioritized in Purple Line activities. After consultation with the members of the Traffic and Safety Committee, the NWCA Board sent a letter of support that also stated the following:

“As we foresee a greatly increased volume of traffic once the Talbot Bridge is opened, the North Woodside Association also wants to take this opportunity to remind Montgomery County, specifically the Montgomery County Department of Transportation, of its commitment, made to us last January and February in a public meeting and follow up emails, that once the Bridge is reopened the County will work with all three of our neighborhoods to mitigate any traffic disruptions.”

We believe that with the support of Lyttonsville and Rosemary Hills, we will obtain the traffic mitigations we’ll request in the future.

The approval of almost all types of mitigation requests is based on traffic-volume studies. So it would be wise to wait for the bridge to be open a few months and for the pandemic to have passed before requesting such a study.

2nd Avenue

Residents on 2nd Avenue have concerns about traffic speed and volume, particularly regarding pedestrian safety. The Traffic and Safety Committee will follow up with the county to request a review of all options for better traffic control and pedestrian protection.

— by Merrie Blocker and Julie Lees, Co-chairs, Traffic and Safety Committee

Before Calling the Police, Ask Yourself…

Hundreds of residents of Rosemary Hills, Lyttonsville, and North Woodside gathered in June for a candlelight vigil in memory of George Floyd, a Black man murdered by Minneapolis police. Participants were silent for 8 minutes 46 seconds, the length of time an officer kneeled on Floyd’s neck. His last words: I can’t breathe.

Before Calling the Police, Ask Yourself:

1. Is this merely an inconvenience to me? → Can I put up with this and be okay?

2. No, I need to respond. → Can I handle this on my own? Is this something I could try to talk out with the person?

3. No, I need backup. → Is there a friend, neighbor, or someone whom I could call to help me?

4. No, I need a professional. → Can we use mediation to talk through what’s happening, or is there an emergency response hotline I could call?

5. No. → If I call the police, do I understand how involving the police could impact me and the other person? If police are present do I know what to do? See below for some alternatives

Alternatives to Calling Police

And Ways to Help in Montgomery County

Mediation: Conflict Resolution Center of Montgomery County
301-652-0717, Mon.–Fri. 9:30 am–4:30 pm, or submit an online request. Mediation is a free, confidential, nonjudgmental, and voluntary process to develop solutions to conflict.

Mental Health: Montgomery County 24 Hour Crisis Center
240-777-4000
Provides services 24 hours/day year-round. Mobile Crisis Outreach will respond anywhere within Montgomery County to provide emergency psychiatric evaluations. Full crisis assessments and treatment referrals are provided for psychiatric and situational crises.

Victim Support and Sexual Assault: Montgomery County Victim and Sexual Assault Program (VASAP)
240-777-4357, 24-hours/day
Information and referral, advocacy, crisis and ongoing counseling, support and compensation services for victims of crimes committed in Montgomery County or crime victims who live in Montgomery County, as well as to the victims’ families and significant others.

Severe Heat or Cold: Montgomery County 24 Hour Crisis Center
If someone needs shelter.

Source: SURJ Montgomery County

2nd Annual Talbot Avenue Bridge Lantern Walk

The historic Talbot Avenue Bridge has been demolished and the new one is yet to be built, so the 2nd Annual Lantern Walk honored the legacy of the Bridge connecting adjoining neighborhoods, while not actually crossing over it.

On Saturday, November 9, 2019, neighbors from Lyttonsville, North Woodside, and Rosemary Hills and friends gathered at dusk behind the Coffield Community Center for a few remarks and lighting of lanterns. As darkness fell, they carried their lights in a procession around the Rosemary Hills-Lyttonsville Local Park, returning to where they started for light refreshments and hot beverages. See below for a gallery of photos taken by Jay Mallin.

Many thanks to North Woodside’s local community artist extraordinaire, Bertie LoPiccolo, for leading a lantern-making workshop at the Coffield Community Center earlier in the day. Both events were organized by the Talbot Avenue Bridge Committee.

See photos of last year’s inaugural Talbot Avenue Bridge Lantern Walk and Lantern-Making Workshop here.

Three Neighborhoods Meet to Discuss Traffic Concerns

Michael Paylor, MCDOT, fielding a plethora of questions from local residents.


by Julie Lees, Traffic & Safety Committee

Neighbors from North Woodside, Lyttonsville, and Rosemary Hills met on January 13th with Michael Paylor, Chief of Traffic Engineering, Montgomery County Department of Transportation (MCDOT). The goal was to develop a common understanding of potential traffic issues stemming from the new Talbot Ave. Bridge and the county’s plan for traffic calming and pedestrian safety.

Julie Lees, co-chair of the North Woodside Traffic and Safety Committee, began the meeting with an outline of concerns, noting that the wider two-lane bridge will potentially increase vehicular speed and may attract more vehicles, especially from out-of-area drivers. There is particular concern about pedestrian and cyclist safety in the area where the pedestrian/cyclist trail crosses the two lanes of traffic on the bridge at 4th Ave.

Michael Paylor discussed the county’s current plan for traffic control around the bridge and responded to audience questions and comments. The plan is to reestablish a three-way stop at the 4th Ave. end of the bridge. Mr. Paylor said he understood that the Purple Line was responsible for traffic mitigation on the bridge, but was told during the meeting that the state has explicitly stated that traffic mitigation and safety was the responsibility of the county. A recurring theme was the challenge of enforcement. Signs alone do not change driver behavior.

Audience members suggested a raised crosswalk for the trail, which Mr. Paylor said was feasible. There were questions about pedestrian-activated lights. There are two types of lights—one linked to a stoplight and one that sets off a blinking yellow light. Mr. Paylor said the former was a poor fit for our needs due to the short distance on the bridge. There were questions about design options that could slow vehicles, such as the bump outs on Dale Dr. and at Spring and Second. The bump outs can be done at the request of the neighborhood association in conjunction with county traffic engineers.

Vehicle Access Restriction, which requires a specific percentage of out-of-area traffic, was discussed as an option. Examples of VAR include the restrictions on Second Ave. access in Woodside during rush hour. Mr. Paylor noted that VAR restricts turns or entrance for residents as well as out-of-area vehicles. In the three- neighborhood area, examples include one-way access to the bridge during rush hour or restrictions on feeder streets such as Grace Church at 16th St. No recommen-dations or preferences were noted.

Geoff Gerhardt, NWCA vice president, asked that MCDOT provide our neighborhoods with a list of traffic mitigation and safety options for our consideration. This was met with audience applause. Mr. Paylor agreed to this request and said he would be meeting with his staff to discuss our suggestions and concerns.

To request a more detailed summary of the meeting, contact the Traffic and Safety Committee.

Lyttonsville, North Woodside, and Rosemary Hills neighbors mingle, check out the Talbot Avenue Bridge map, and ask questions of Michael Paylor, MCDOT, after the meeting.

Talbot Avenue Bridge Design and Traffic Mitigation

Courtesy Purple Line

The traffic committee has made some headway on the Talbot Avenue Bridge design issue—the fencing will now be faux-wrought iron backed by chain-link over CSX tracks (two-thirds) and by plexiglass over Purple Line tracks (one-third). Previous designs featured plexiglass across the entire bridge and, later, only chain link over the CSX tracks. Note: The plexiglass and chain link in the current design are elements required by Purple Line and CSX standards.

We are also working with Lyttonsville and Rosemary Hills to set up traffic mitigation discussions with Montgomery County Department of Transportation for when the new Talbot Bridge opens. Stay tuned for future meeting notices.

Neighbors who are interested in working on the Traffic and Safety Committee on these and other traffic/pedestrian safety issues can contact the co-chairs.

Farewell to a Historic Bridge

Talbot Avenue Bridge Candlelight Vigil, on eve of the century-old bridge’s final closure before demolition.

On June 4, 2019, the Purple Line Transit Constructors closed and began demolition of the historic wood and steel Talbot Avenue Bridge. Built in 1918 from an overturned train turntable from West Virginia, the century-old Bridge was the last remaining historically-significant structure of the historically African-American community of Lyttonsville, founded in 1853 by free man of color Samuel Lytton. Originally two-lane, the Bridge served as a lifeline to Lyttonsville residents through a significant portion of the 20th Century, when Silver Spring was very starkly racially segregated and ~50 neighborhoods in Silver Spring, including North Woodside, had racially restrictive deed covenants that prohibited African Americans from owning property or living in them, except as domestic servants. In recent years, current and former Lyttonsville residents have shared visceral memories of racial bigotry they experienced in North Woodside, and how they viewed efforts by North Woodside residents to permanently close the Bridge in the 1990s as racially-motivated.

A year ago, Lyttonsville, North Woodside, and Rosemary Hills neighbors came together to organize the Talbot Avenue Bridge Centennial Celebration at which NWCA President David Cox presented a unanimously-passed NWCA Board resolution acknowledging and strongly denouncing racial bigotry in all its forms, past and present. North Woodside is the first (and only so far) neighborhood in Montgomery County—and one of only a few in the U.S.—to publicly acknowledge and denounce racist deed covenants of the past. Read the resolution in full and view its presentation.

Over the past year, neighbors connected by the Bridge have continued to collaborate, organizing a number of Bridge-related social and educational community events. At sunset on the eve of the Bridge’s closing community members gathered on the Bridge one last time for a Candlelight Vigil to mark this transition and enjoy a final moment in the historic space.

On July 5, 2019, a small crowd gathered for the much anticipated lifting of the Bridge’s steel girders. The girders are currently being stored by the County, along with other saved parts, for eventual placement along the Capitol Crescent Trail in a new County park that will be created in Lyttonsville following Purple Line construction.

For photos, videos and more info about Talbot Avenue Bridge events this past year, go to: talbotbridge100.org (click on “Events”)

Thanks to all neighbors, too numerous to list, who have contributed in one way or another to Bridge-related events this past year!

For more information about the history Talbot Avenue Bridge and racial segregation in Silver Spring, watch Silver Spring: A Sundown Suburb in the Capital’s Gateway, a presentation by public historian David Rotenstein or check out his collection of writings on the the topic.

On June 13, 2019, County Executive Marc Elrich presented Montgomery County Civic Federation’s Wayne Goldstein Award to the Talbot Avenue Bridge Centennial Committee for their work for racial reconciliation and preservation of elements of this historic bridge to educate future generations about segregation in Montgomery County’s history: Alan Bowser, Marcie Stickle, George French, Charlotte Coffield*, Joel Teitelbaum†, Pat Tyson*, Elmoria Stewart*, Merrie Blocker‡, Eva Santorin†, Anna White‡. Not pictured: David Rotenstein, Laura Hussey. *Lifelong resident of Lyttonsville; †Rosemary Hills resident; ‡North Woodside resident